Owen Flanagan’s “The Bodhisattva’s Brain” Is A Fascinating Convergence Of Buddhist Ethics And Brain Science

by • September 3, 2011 • Neuroscience, Philosophy, Sam Harris, Science, SpiritualityComments (0)1437

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Acclaimed author, neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris recently gave Owen Flanagan’s The Bodhisattva’s Brain his full recommendation  The following is a brief synopsis of the book: If we are material beings living in a material world–and all the scientific evidence suggests that we are–then we must find existential meaning, if there is such a thing, in this physical world. We must cast our lot with the natural rather than the supernatural. Many Westerners with spiritual (but not religious) inclinations are attracted to Buddhism–almost as a kind of moral-mental hygiene. But, as Owen Flanagan points out in The Bodhisattva’s Brain, Buddhism is hardly naturalistic. Atheistic when it comes to a creator god, Buddhism is otherwise opulently polytheistic, with spirits, protector deities, ghosts, and evil spirits. Its beliefs include karma, rebirth, nirvana, and nonphysical states of mind. What is a nonreligious, materially grounded spiritual seeker to do? In The Bodhisattva’s Brain, Flanagan argues that it is possible to subtract the “hocus pocus” from Buddhism and discover a rich, empirically responsible philosophy that could point us to one path of human flourishing. “Buddhism naturalized,” as Flanagan constructs it, contains a metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics; it is a fully naturalistic and comprehensive philosophy, compatible with the rest of knowledge. Some claim that neuroscience is in the process of validating Buddhism empirically, but Flanagan’s naturalized Buddhism does not reduce itself to a brain scan showing happiness patterns. Buddhism naturalized offers instead a tool for achieving happiness and human flourishing–a way of conceiving of the human predicament, of thinking about meaning for finite material beings living in a material world.  To pick up your own copy of the amazingness that is The Bodhisattva’s Brain simply head over to Amazon.  To follow Sam Harris on Facebook CLICK HERE.  For all FEELguide posts related to Sam Harris CLICK HERE.

SEE ALSO: Modern Neurology And Neuroscience Findings Have “Significant” Overlaps With The Core Tenets Of Buddhism
SEE ALSO: Neuroscientists Discover Daily Meditation Reduces Pain By 40-57% (Double The Relief Of Morphine)

Source: Sam Harris on Facebook
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